Two Brewers Classic

Two Brewers Classic

Two Brewers started in 1997 when Bob Baxter and Al Hansen founded the brewery in 1997, after a canoe trip in Yukon, Canada. A dozen years later, then decided to take the next step and start making whisky. Using their experience as brewers and knowing the importance of the malt and the fermentation, they pay special attention to those steps as from the start they have a great influence on the final product. Those final products are numbered and unique, without a search for homogeneity, and classified in one of their ‘collections’: Classic, Innovation and their Special Finishes single casks. What we’re trying today is not one of their very latest batches but let’s try it anyway: the release N°26: a Two Brewers Classic

Two Brewers Classic

Colour:

Chestnut. The crown is full of small beads that turn in quick thin legs.

Nose:

Intense and quite fruity. Orange, plum, peach, pear, apricot and pineapple. A few sharp grain notes, honey, mint, and some baking spices. Fresh brioche from Vendée. Really good.

Palate:

Fruity and spicy arrival, buttery. Good oily mouthfeel. Multiple fruits again, stone fruits mostly, but also with pear and bananas. Some oak spices, ginger, pear eau-de-vie, blackcurrant liqueur, a teaspoon of honey, and a light citrusy sourness in the back. There’s something sweet as well reminding me somehow of sweet potato.

Finish:

The yellow stone fruits linger on with the oak spices, and (genuine French) croissant crumb (from the bakery, not the supermarket of course), with a medium length.

Comments

This whisky greets you with a beautiful nose, very fruity. Quite gourmand as well with the brioche notes. The palate is very nice as well, though maybe a tad under the nose, and a good finish, maybe a wee bit under as well. Anyway, good surprise as I must admit I didn’t know about this distillery before getting that sample, and I’ll keep an eye out for opportunities to try some more.

Rating: 85/100


Lead photo: Two Brewers. Bottle photo: Whiskybase. Thanks Damien for the sample!

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