Coldorak as a Greedy Angel.

Amrut 10yo Greedy Angels Peated Sherry Finish

Back in 2019, Amrut released three expressions of its top shelf Greedy Angels. The first one was the unpeated ex-bourbon cask 10-year-old Greedy Angels I reviewed back in 2019. It was also the occasion for me to dive into what’s the Angels’ Share, and if you haven’t read this article, I encourage you to do so. The second one was the 10yo Greedy Angels Peated Rum Finish I reviewed a few weeks ago. And the third and last one was the one I’ll review today (take a deep breath): the Amrut 10-year-old Greedy Angels Peated Sherry Finish. I’ve talked about this range previously, so let’s directly jump to the tasting.

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Caol Ila 2010 Signatory Vintage in front of the distillery.

Caol Ila 2010 Signatory Vintage

Caol Ila, located on the world’s home of peated whisky, the Scottish island of Islay, is this island’s number one distillery in terms of capacity. Though its peated malt is one of the components of Johnnie Walker, the distillery features a full core range of single malts. But that wasn’t always the case, as until 2002, Caol Ila’s single malt would appear only in the Flora & Fauna and the Rare Malts range. But from 2002, the regular 12-and-18-year-old as well as a Cask Strength version (about 10yo) appeared, joined the next year by the 25-years-old. Since then, Moch – without an age statement – and the Distiller’s Edition, with a moscatel finish, joined the core range. But Caol Ila’s single malt is not just available on the distillery’s official bottlings, it’s also highly available to independent bottlers. Gordon & Macphail, Elixir Distillers, or like today, Signatory Vintage, have bottled dozens and dozens of casks from the distillery located in Port Askaig. And that’s what we’re going to try today, with a Caol Ila 2010 Signatory Vintage.

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Dublin Liberties Distillery

Dublin Liberties Distillery Whiskey

Whilst the distillery is installed in a very old building, initially a mill constructed in the 1700s, in the heart of Dublin, it’s a very recent distillery that started production in 2019. The distillery is named after the Liberties district of Dublin, an historic district of this city. New distilleries have several choices when they start and until their whisk(e)y comes of age. They can produce unaged spirits like gin or vodka to have immediate income while the future whisky matures. They can also just wait the required three years, but that needs to have enough cash from the start as it means close to no income for the first few years, except maybe for the income from a visitor centre. And finally, they can source whisky from other distilleries, potentially blend it, mature it for an additional period, or finish it in a selection of casks, and sell it under their name with a markup. That’s the third choice Dublin Liberties Distillery did, and we’re now going to try four of their expressions, all sourced from undisclosed (as far as I know) Irish distilleries.

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Looking back at 2021

Looking back at 2021

First, dear reader, let me thank you for being here reading this humble blog and all those words spat out by the lousy blogger that I am. You are one of not that many, I’ll come back to that, so thank you. Then, allow me to wish you a very happy New Year, full of joy, good health and great whisky. It’s time, slightly late as usual, for me to look back in the rear-view mirror and recap the whisky side of 2021. So grab a dram, sit comfortably, and let’s go. And yes, the irony of saying let’s go after telling you to sit doesn’t elude me.

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